Help for those affected by the hurricanes | Learn More

A message from Aflac

To our policyholders in areas affected by the recent hurricanes, please know that the thoughts and prayers of everyone at Aflac are with you. We are working with government agencies that represent all declared disaster areas to ensure we do everything possible to help you. Based on that guidance, we have extended the due dates for policy premiums by 60 days for those living in places that have been declared disaster areas. If you have a question about your policy or need help, contact us at 800-992-3522. To help with the recovery, Aflac made a $500,000 donation to the American Red Cross, and our employees are making their own private contributions. Please be safe, as the care of you and your families is paramount.

To request a quote, fill out our Contact Form and we'll call you or Call Us now at

800.992.3522
Business Hours

Monday thru Friday . 8:00 AM - 8:00 PM EST

Request a Quote
Provide your information so an Aflac agent can reach you.

All fields are required.

Monday - Friday 8:00 AM to 11:00 PM ET
Saturday 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM ET

Current time: 1:52 pm EDT
An Aflac agent will call you within 15 minutes

Select a date and time you'd like to be
contacted by an Aflac agent.

All fields are required.

By hitting submit, I agree to receive autodialed calls from Aflac, an independent contractor Aflac associate, and Sutherland Global Services working at Aflac’s request, at the number provided. Message and data rates may apply. I understand I am not required to provide my consent as a condition of accessing Aflac’s website or purchasing Aflac’s products.

Thank You!

An Aflac agent will call you
within 15 minutes.

Your confirmation number is .

If you have any questions regarding your request, contact us at salesinquiry@aflac.com

Please provide your confirmation number listed above for reference.

Close

Follow The Duck

The Aflac Duck travels across the country visiting children’s cancer hospitals and communities impacted by childhood cancer. At each stop, he awards his friends leaving a Footprint in the fight! Click here to watch the NEW Duckprints Awards video.
View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and #duckprints hashtag signs

Columbia, SC

August 24, 2017

The second stop on our 2017 Duckprints tour brought us back to long-time partner, Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital, to celebrate those making an impact on children facing cancer. Honorees included former patient and advocate, Craig Q. King; hospital and CAMP KEMO volunteer, Julian E. Ruffin; and Curing Kids Cancer founders, Grainne and Clay Owen.

View Event Details

Columbia, SC

August 24, 2017

About Duckprints Award Recipient Craig Q. King

Many people spend their entire lives searching for purpose. Clarity of purpose, for some, develops later in life or never at all. At 17, Craig King discovered his purpose: “to inspire, teach and serve the people of the world.” Craig is living his purpose and considers it a gift given to him by cancer.

In 1999, Craig was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, a type of bone tumor. After his left tibia and kneecap were removed and reconstructed, he began a year of chemotherapy in the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital. This life-changing experience opened Craig’s heart to selfless giving. After completing treatment and learning to walk again, Craig was inspired to become a mentor and counselor in 2001 for CAMP KEMO, an annual camp for children facing cancer and their siblings. Soon after, Craig co-founded “Craig Q. King’s Celebration of Life Gala” with his mother, Paulette King. Over the years since his diagnosis, Craig and his family have raised more than $100,000 in event proceeds that have been donated to Children’s Hospital and other charitable organizations.

Craig, a native of Manning, S.C., is Director of Governmental Affairs for the Palmetto State Teachers Association in Columbia and is the CEO and founder of the Craig King Group, LLC. He has been recognized with numerous leadership awards, including 2007-2008 District Teacher of the Year for Orangeburg Consolidated School District Five, the 2008 Charles Dickerson Community Service Award presented to one South Carolina teacher for service to the community and 2013 M.A. Lee Scholarship Gala Medical & Health Activist Award.

About Duckprints Award Recipient Julian E. Ruffin, Ph.D.

Diligence, passion and selflessness—three components that make up the body and soul of those who serve as trailblazers for the greater good. For nearly 35 years, Julian Ruffin has demonstrated this type of servant leadership in our community.

Working as the director of the Child and Adolescent division of Columbia Area Mental Health Center in 1981, Julian began his relationship with Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital as a volunteer. He spent countless lunch breaks working with patients and families who were having a difficult time emotionally during treatment. This fueled his desire to get more involved. In 1983, he became a volunteer counselor with the adolescent boys at CAMP KEMO, a one-week summer camp for children with cancer and their siblings. CAMP KEMO became one of his greatest passions, both personally and professionally. Two years later, he was one of the co-founders of Lasting Impressions, a peer support group for teen cancer patients and survivors. In 1993, after 12 years of volunteering, he joined the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders team as coordinator of Psychosocial programs and Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics with the USC School of Medicine.

In the years that followed, Julian developed other innovative programs such as the “Gather, Relax and Come Eat” (GRACE) dinner; “HUGGIES,” a parent support group for those with pre-school children being treated for cancer; Family Weekend, a three-day retreat for newly diagnosed families to provide peer support, and Camp New Horizons, a weekend camp for children who have lost their siblings to cancer or a blood disorder. He continued his passion for CAMP KEMO by becoming the leader for the Counselors in Training (CITs) and was instrumental in advocating for a CAMP KEMO web page so parents could see pictures of their children participating at camp. Julian also was an active member of the Professional Advisory Group for the Pastoral Care department and served as chair of this group for many years. He also led seminars on Grief and Loss in Children for Clinical Pastoral Education students and medical residents. Now retired, Julian is spending some of his free time volunteering with the Palmetto Conservation Foundation and as a Disaster Mental Health volunteer with the American Red Cross.

About Duckprints Award Recipient Curing Kids Cancer (Clay and Grainne Owen)

Grainne and Clay Owen’s life took a significant detour when they lost their son, Killian, to leukemia in 2003. From that moment forward, the Owens made a commitment to create a legacy for Killian that would be carried out through Curing Kids Cancer, established in 2005.

For nearly 12 years, Curing Kids Cancer has partnered with Palmetto Health Foundation and Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital to support the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. More than $312,000 has been donated to help fund a research nurse and advancements in childhood cancer treatment. This funding set Children’s Hospital into motion to bring stage one and stage two clinical trials, the most innovative therapies, to children in South Carolina. Without these treatments, children would likely have to travel outside of the state and leave their families and support systems.

Curing Kids Cancer and the Owens’ commitment was elevated last year when they announced their pledge to establish a $1.2 million endowment to establish the Gamecocks Curing Kids Cancer Clinic at Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital. Curing Kids Cancer Endowment funds will help the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders team with the complex processes of helping families navigate the clinical trials process, enrolling childhood cancer patients in clinical studies and ensuring patient data is collected accurately.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and #duckprints hashtag signs

Santa Barbara, CA

August 10, 2017

The 2017 Duckprints Tour kicked off at Cottage Children’s Medical Center in Santa Barbara, CA. Aflac was proud to honor local heroes including two former patients, Faith DeBrum & Jasmin Castro, who have taken on vital fundraising projects and Anita Williamson who provides patients with Loving Tabs shirts designed for easy port access during treatment.

View Event Details

Santa Barbara, CA

August 10, 2017

About Duckprints Award Recipient Faith DeBrum

Three weeks after her grandfather passed away from cancer, Faith felt a lump on her collarbone. Having witnessed “Papa’s” decline for a year and ultimately seeing him succumb to lung cancer, she was understandably frightened.

The diagnosis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma arrived on Faith’s 11th birthday.

Her parents, Ronnie and Laura, assured her that Papa’s cancer wasn’t like hers, and that her cancer would be curable. From their home in Santa Maria, the family traveled to Cottage Children’s Medical Center, where Faith underwent four rounds of chemotherapy.

Faith has been instrumental with her involvement in Children's Miracle Network Hospitals’ fundraising for Cottage Children's Medical Center. Every year, May is Miracle Month at Costco – where her parents work – and it’s during this time that the warehouse asks customers at the register if they'd like to make a donation.

Faith’s photo is displayed prominently on a banner to serve as an inspiration for the impact the community can have on saving kids' lives. Now 13 years old, Faith has been cancer-free for two years.

This year, the warehouse hosted its inaugural Memorial Day Miracle Walk/Run and BBQ, where Faith and her mom headed up the walkers, while her dad led the charge of runners. Thanks to their efforts (and those of their work family), Costco is Cottage’s top CMNH corporate partner in the community.

About Duckprints Award Recipient Jasmin Castro

Unexplained bleeding prompted Jasmin’s mom to rush her to the closest Emergency Room in Ojai, Calif., when she was just 1 year old. She was quickly transferred to nearby Cottage Children’s Medical Center where an egg-sized mass was discovered, diagnosed as a germ cell tumor.

“We were told she might only have five days to live,” said Jasmin’s mom, Juana, as the growth rapidly increased to the size of a lemon, then to that of an orange.

Jasmin spent a month in Cottage’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit before moving to the Acute Pediatrics floor. The family “practically lived” at Cottage for six months, as Jasmin underwent intense chemotherapy; treatment at such a young age resulted in some hearing loss.

She overcame the odds but was faced with another challenge years later when she turned 15. That’s when Jasmin collapsed from an aneurysm.

Again she was taken to Cottage, where she spent a little more than three weeks in the ICU in an induced coma. Afterwards, she had to relearn how to walk and talk.

Today, 17-year-old Jasmin is in good health and recently shared her experiences on Spanish radio with her family during the Children's Miracle Network Radio Bronco 107.7 Radiothon.

Her entire family, who took time out of their busy schedule, donned Cottage Children's Medical Center shirts and rallied donations during rush hour on the corner of Milpas Street alongside the station's DJ, collecting more than $1,200 from passersby to help kids like Jasmin at Cottage.

About Duckprints Award Recipient Anita Williamson

Seeing a picture of her friend’s young daughter undergoing chemotherapy in a hospital gown marked “Property of Cottage Hospital,” Anita was inspired to take action: There must be a friendlier, more comfortable outfit for kids facing cancer, she thought.

That was the moment she decided to do something.

Anita contacted her friends, Diane and Richard Nares, co-founders of the Emilio Nares Foundation in San Diego (enfhope.org). The organization helps low-income and underserved families meet basic needs associated with caring for a sick child, and it honors the memory of the couple’s 5-year-old son, who passed away due to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Through the Emilio Nares Foundation, Anita purchased and then donated to Cottage Children’s Medical Center a total of 300 soft, colorful Loving Tabs T-shirts designed with snap openings at the shoulder and sleeve to allow for easy port access during infusion treatments. Her donation was in honor of the doctors who cared for her during a recent hospital stay.

Thanks to Anita’s generosity, patients at Cottage's Grotenhuis Pediatric Clinics are able to receive the garments for free and can take them home and reuse them for future treatments.

Anita plans to establish a program that will continue to benefit all children undergoing cancer treatment in the future, which will enhance the comfort of pediatric patients.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and #duckprints hashtag signs

Dayton, Ohio

October 18, 2016

Our final stop of the 2016 Duckprints Tour brought us to Dayton Children’s Hospital in Dayton, OH. Local news anchor, Cherly McHenry, aided in honoring Moms 4 Miracles, a group of women dedicated to the cause; Gina Robinette, a beloved nurse at Dayton Children’s; and 14-year-old Kayleigh Crabtree who raised money and awareness for childhood cancer without knowing she would face the same cancer battle as those she had helped.

View Event Details

Dayton, Ohio

October 18, 2016

Moms 4 Miracles

When founder Sallie Taylor was called to raise money for The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society she called on her friends – an incredible group of mothers – to help her raise money. They went above and beyond, raising $42,000 in honor of children with cancer, with the biggest fundraiser being a golf outing. That amount earned Taylor the title of “Woman of the Year” and cemented her future as a champion for children.

The next year, Sallie created the Moms 4 Miracles Fund through the Dayton Foundation. Every year, this group of dedicated moms host their annual golf outing. They have also added a Derby Day event, and local businesses have all joined in with fundraisers. Battling cancer is a long process, with weeks spent in the hospital at a time, so these Moms also have purchased gaming systems and tablet devices to help entertain kids.

During the last year, they raised $25,000 to name an outpatient transfusion room in the new pediatric cancer treatment floor of the patient tower currently under construction at Dayton Children’s main campus.

With the proceeds, the Moms help pay off medical bills, make wishes come true, fund research or support hospital initiatives. While their fundraising takes a lot of time, hard work and perseverance, Moms 4 Miracles says it’s actually become another blessing. They get to see the indomitable spirit of youth conquer illness. They get to be a part of healing and hope. And in the end, they get to help make miracles.

Gina Robinette

No matter how much has changed in Gina Robinette’s 30 years at Dayton Children’s Hospital, one thing remains constant – the human connection. Technology has advanced and new treatments continue to emerge, but according to Robinette, nothing beats humans taking care of humans.

Battling cancer is a long fight and patients become a part of a family at Dayton Children’s. Despite the arduous journey, tackling it together, one step at a time, lightens some of the load. Robinette enjoys developing that relationship with patients and their families while doing what she can to help.

The moments she will never forget actually come long after the children she cares for have beaten cancer, grown up and moved on with their lives. These past patients, who Robinette saw at their worst, come back with their own children to visit her. She gets to see the future that she helped create by caring for each child as if they were her own. No matter what a child must endure today, Robinette knows that a brighter future is possible, and she will never stop reminding each child, and each family, that a new day is ahead.

Kayleigh Crabtree

Lemons and pineapples: Two tropical fruits that will always remind Kayleigh that the fight against cancer is never over. While she is now cancer-free, her own battle with the disease made her more passionate about raising money and awareness than ever.

Kayleigh’s learned the word ‘cancer’ at the tender age of 6 when she was introduced to Alex’s Lemonade Stand, an organization which raises money for childhood cancer research. She started hosting her own lemonade stands and in two seasons raised more than $500 for the organization.

Never did she think that after those two successful summers she would be on the other side of the stand. At age 8, Kayleigh was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

The battle would be long and hard for young Kayleigh – five phases of chemotherapy and losing her hair twice. Through it all, she had a champion by her side – a man she liked to call Dr. Pineapple. His real name is Dr. Mukund Dole, spelled like the name on a can of pineapple but pronounced with an “a” on the end. He was Kayleigh’s oncologist, and he and the team at Dayton Children’s together helped Kayleigh and her family make it through two years of treatment with a successful outcome.

Today at age 14, Kayleigh is just as passionate about raising money for cancer causes, including Dayton Children’s, Children’s Miracle Network, CureSearch and others. At the end of the day, Kayleigh knows that the roots of awareness and support that she plants will bear fruit for generations of cancer care to come.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and #duckprints hashtag signs

Mesa, Arizona

October 13, 2016

The Aflac Duck traveled to Mesa, AZ for our third stop on the Duckprints tour to Cardon Children’s Medical Center. Honorees included Scott Starr, a former patient who now mentors current cancer patients; Joel Nava, another former patient and soon-to-be nurse at Cardon; and the McKenzie Monks Foundation, created in honor of the 4-year-old who lost her battle but still leaves her footprint through the foundation.

View Event Details

Mesa, Arizona

October 13, 2016

Scott Starr

Scott Starr left his footprints at Cardon Children’s Medical Center from the beginning of his battle with Burkitt’s Lymphoma at the end of his junior year of high school in May 2015.

The diagnosis came right as Starr was beginning his lifelong dream of entering the Marines. Starr soon learned that because of his diagnosis, he would not be able to meet the Marine health requirements. However, this did not stop him from moving forward to plan B, which included finishing high school.

Starr’s cancer treatment included several severe surgeries, planned and unplanned, along with chemotherapy. Not only did he endure this difficult treatment, but he spent weeks on a ventilator in the pediatric ICU. Yet Starr never let himself be defined by his cancer.

Starr never lost his smile, positive attitude and sense of humor. He remained who he was, passionate about the military, his family, his friends, and his will to overcome each and every obstacle. Following Starr’s last surgery, doctors informed his family it would be several days and maybe even weeks before he would be up and moving again. Starr was up and out of his bed within 24 hours of his final surgery.

Due to all the challenges he faced during treatment, it was unclear whether Starr would be able to meet the requirements to graduate from high school. As graduation approached, Starr worked hard on completing his schoolwork and was able to fulfill his dream of graduating.

Starr is now cancer free and has since been considering becoming an EMT or a firefighter. Though he has completed all his treatments, he continues to leave his footprints on Cardon Children's Hospital through his involvement in community programs to help raise awareness as well as through mentoring of several other patients who are battling cancer.

Joel Nava

Joel Nava was diagnosed at 13 years old with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in May 2003, and later it relapsed in his central nervous system.

He was a quiet, caring and polite young teen who was very bright and had plans for high academic achievement. The two things that Nava loved most were his family and school. His biggest worry at diagnosis was that he was just about to start at Brophy College Preparatory school and missed the entire first year. Because of his love of academics, it took a lot to keep him busy and not bored on long hospital stays – especially when he had shingles and had to stay in his room.

In fact, he decided to write a hospital newsletter and posted it in the staff bathroom for all to know the happenings and gossip of the unit. The newsletter frequently had doctor and nursing tidbits in it regarding life events such as who was in school, who was getting married and who was pregnant. The nurses still talk about Nava’s newsletter. Nava also made a paper snowman once and would change the theme of the snowman on the unit wall when he came in for admissions to correspond with the holiday or someone’s birthday. He loved to teach the nurses Spanish and would laugh when he would make them say crazy things.

As a young adult, Nava took a trip to Japan in a World Study Abroad Program. While there he decided he wanted to pursue a career in nursing. Nava went on to ASU Nursing School and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing and health innovation. He credits his pediatric oncology nurses as his mentors, saying, “My nurses were there for me,” and they “epitomize the idea of compassion and empathy.”

McKenzie Monks Foundation

McKenzie Monks was just 3 years old when those dreaded words were heard: “She has cancer.” McKenzie was diagnosed with bilateral Wilms tumor – cancer in both kidneys. Life would never be the same for her and those who loved her dearly.

Immediately, McKenzie and her family took action. McKenzie faced a new life of doctors, needles, 11 months of chemo, 12 surgeries, 50 radiation treatments, intense pain and the brutal process of undergoing a bone marrow transplant. During her courageous journey, McKenzie was often seen pulling her Hello Kitty suitcase filled with some of her favorite things to keep her busy and provide her comfort during treatment.

After 19 months, McKenzie left the life of pain she had come to know, but what she left behind continues to be a gift to so many. McKenzie’s family – her mom, Denise Monks; dad, Richard Monks; and sisters, Michelle and Mandy Monks – knew they wanted to keep her spirit alive. Their footprints began with the creation of the McKenzie Monks Foundation. The mission of their work is to help children cope with the long days of battling cancer. Since 2004, nearly 3,000 Kenzie Kases have been given to children that are fighting cancer. These Kases were inspired after the Hello Kitty suitcase that brought McKenzie joy and comfort. Each child receives a Kase with an iPad (or DVD player), blankets, toys and crafts.

Not only does the McKenzie Monks Foundation provide Kenzie Kases, but it has also created a special space at Cardon Children’s for young patients. Kenzie Korner was built for children to step away from their treatment for much needed breaks where they can relax, have fun and just be a kid.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with their Aflac Footprints awards

Columbia, South Carolina

September 7, 2016

The second stop of the #Duckprints tour takes us back to long-time Aflac hospital partner, Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital in Columbia, SC to honor four heroes who have left their footprint in the fight.

View Event Details

Columbia, South Carolina

September 7, 2016

The second stop of the #Duckprints tour takes us back to long-time Aflac hospital partner, Palmetto Health Children’s Hospital in Columbia, SC to honor four heroes who have left their footprint in the fight.

Voice of the South Carolina Gamecocks, Todd Ellis, joined us as the master of ceremonies as we celebrated Paul and Sarah Towns, longtime CAMP KEMO supporters and executers of Elgin Lights, a Christmas lights show that honors Cole Sawyer, who lost the fight to childhood cancer in 2004.

Longtime Aflac medical director of the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Palmetto Health was also honored for his efforts in the fight. Our final honoree, Stacy Sawyer, was a valued advisor and advocate for CAMP KEMO. Although Stacy received this award posthumously, her memory will live on with the success of CAMP KEMO.

Finally DJ Fisher, a 17-year-old patient at Palmetto Health, was present to share his story and was recognized for this invaluable peer support to other children also undergoing cancer treatment.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and #duckprints hashtag signs

Atlanta, Georgia

September 6, 2016

To kick off Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, the Aflac Duck begins his #Duckprints tour right here in Atlanta at the Aflac Cancer Center.

View Event Details

Atlanta, Georgia

September 6, 2016

To kick off Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, the Aflac Duck begins his #Duckprints tour right here in Atlanta at the Aflac Cancer Center. Long-time broadcaster for Turner Sports, Ernie Johnson Jr., aided the Duck in handing out the year’s first awards to two local heroes for their significant contributions in the battle against childhood cancer.

Honorees included WSB’s Atlanta Morning News host, Scott Slade, who started the WSB Radio Care-a-Thon for the Aflac Cancer Center raising over $19 million since it’s inception in 2001. Also receiving an award is advanced practice nurse and founder of Camp Sunshine, Dorothy Jordan. Started in 1983, Camp Sunshine, has provided year-round recreational, educational and supportive programming for children with cancer and their families.

Event attendees also heard the story of Ellanor Young, a brave girl diagnosed with leukemia at only 4 years old who is now in remission. Her fight inspired her father’s lacrosse team to form the nonprofit Lax for Leukemia Inc., which donates to Aflac Cancer Center needs.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and #duckprints hashtag signs

Dayton, Ohio

September 29, 2015

On Wednesday, September 4, 2013, the Aflac Duck launched his Journey around the United States visiting children's cancer hospitals to bring the Duckprints message and impact to each community with a great event in Atlanta.

View Event Details

Dayton, Ohio

September 29, 2015

The last stop of the 2015 Duckprints tour, brought the Aflac Duck to Dayton Children's Hospital in Dayton, OH. Local news anchor, Cheryl McHenry, hosted the ceremony where we honored 14 year-old cancer patient Colin Beach and his mother Maureen, who while fighting numerous bouts with childhood cancer, managed to use their experience to raise money for other cancer patients, pediatric cancer nurse at Dayton Children's Hospital, Robbie Mirisciotti, R.N., a 20-year veteran care-giver and the Centerville Noon Optimist Club, a fellowship of people who have donated nearly $100,000 to Dayton Children's Hospital for children battling cancer.

"Dayton Children's Hospital is proud to have some of the most valiant warriors in the fight against pediatric cancer be recognized with the Aflac Duckprints Award," said Debbie Feldman, President and CEO of Dayton Children's. "Each of these honorees puts their heart and soul into providing comfort for sick children, to raising awareness about the need children's hospitals have in treating kids with cancer and to fighting this disease day in and day out."

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck

Atlanta, Georgia

September 1, 2015

To recognize its milestone of raising over $100 million towards pediatric cancer research and treatment, the Aflac Duck traveled back to where it all started 20 years ago, the Aflac Cancer Center.

View Event Details

Atlanta, Georgia

September 1, 2015

To recognize its milestone of raising over $100 million towards pediatric cancer research and treatment, the Aflac Duck traveled back to where it all started 20 years ago, the Aflac Cancer Center. The ceremony, hosted by national broadcaster Ernie Johnson, Jr. celebrated nationally recognized comedian, author and TV personality, Jeff Foxworthy and childhood cancer advocates, Vicki and Ansley Riedel.

In 1995, it was Ansley Riedel who was the catalyst for the start of the Aflac Cancer Center. At 10 months old, Ansley was diagnosed with an aggressive form of adult leukemia. Her mother, Vicki, became a huge advocate for Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and it was her passion and drive that led her to Aflac’s door. The response she received was nothing short of amazing.

20 years and $100 million in donations later, the Aflac Cancer Center is proud to see it’s partnership come full circle and will continue to its mission to eradicate childhood cancer.

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck

Columbia, South Carolina

July 17, 2015

On July 17, 2015, The Aflac Duck traveled to Columbia, SC to honor a few local heroes in the fight against childhood cancer. The ceremony, held at Palmetto Health Children's Hospital, recognized Linda Wells, the first pediatric oncology/hematology nurse at Palmetto Health Children's Hospital and co-founder of CAMP KEMO, a camp for children with cancer and their siblings, celebrating its 36th year.

View Event Details

Columbia, South Carolina

July 17, 2015

On July 17, 2015, The Aflac Duck traveled to Columbia, SC to honor a few local heroes in the fight against childhood cancer. The ceremony, held at Palmetto Health Children's Hospital, recognized Linda Wells, the first pediatric oncology/hematology nurse at Palmetto Health Children's Hospital and co-founder of CAMP KEMO, a camp for children with cancer and their siblings, celebrating its 36th year.

Also recognized was local high school, Airport High School, whose annual charity drive has created a movement and inspired philanthropy among students, faculty, staff and alumni. In 11 years, more than $300,000 has been raised for CAMP KEMO Programs of Palmetto Health Children's Hospital.

Attendees also heard the story of Kaitlyn Jacobs, a high school student and patient at Palmetto Health Children's Hospital, whose life has been impacted by childhood cancer.

Legendary Carolina Gamecock quarterback and the current voice of the University of South Carolina Gamecocks, Todd Ellis, served as master of ceremonies for the event. Ellis' daughter Logan is a childhood cancer survivor. Any family who has been touched by cancer, especially those who have seen their child battle this terrible disease, understands why we need to keep fighting every day," Ellis said. "As one of those families, we cannot say enough about these individuals who have dedicated their time and efforts to helping children like Logan. We are thrilled to honor them here today."

“Being a children’s oncology nurse is a career. Going that extra mile and founding a camp for children and families facing cancer is a calling,” said Kathelen Amos, president of the Aflac Foundation. “Organizing a high school to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for families you have never met is an incredible act of selflessness. Today’s awardees are a reflection of Aflac’s values and our community, so we proudly honor them for their heroic efforts.”

“We are so inspired by the honorees today,” said Sam Tenenbaum, president, Palmetto Health Foundation. “Our partnership with Aflac allows us to highlight special people like this who have made such a profound difference in the lives of patients and families.”

Gallery

View Event Details
people pose with Aflac duck and their Aflac footprints awards

Ft. Worth, Texas

April 16, 2015

Aflac brought its Duckprints Awards program to local heroes at Cook Children's Medical Center in Ft. Worth, TX on April 16, 2015. Three honorees were chosen for their efforts to the cause of eradicating childhood cancer.

View Event Details

Ft. Worth, Texas

April 16, 2015

Aflac brought its Duckprints Awards program to local heroes at Cook Children's Medical Center in Ft. Worth, TX on April 16, 2015. Three honorees were chosen for their efforts to the cause of eradicating childhood cancer.

Teresa Clark - who served as Chief Nursing Officer at Cook Children's and dedicated her life to caring for those with cancer. After a courageous battle with cancer herself, Teresa passed away shortly after the awards ceremony on May 20th, 2015. We are honored that we had the chance to recognize her before her passing.

Scott Odom - after being diagnosed with Osteosarcoma at the age of 14, he chose to amputate his right leg above the knee to save his life. Later he co-founded Amp 1, an amputee basketball team.

Mark "Hawkeye" Louis - longtime morning host on heritage country station 96.3 FM KSCS, who served as a camp counselor at Camp Sanguinity from 2002-2006. His 2014 Radiothon raised over $120K for patients at Cook Children's.

“Because of the research happening at places like Cook Children’s Medical Center, the work conducted over the last 50 years has produced a remarkable change in the five-year childhood cancer survival rate - leaping from 20 percent to 80 percent,” said Kathelen Amos, president of the Aflac Foundation. “As Aflac’s primary mission is to assist families when they need it most, we are pleased to honor the special heroes of Texas who work hard to help more families enjoy special times with healthier, more vibrant children.”

“We are honored to recognize and celebrate these three incredible individuals. Cook Children’s is a better place because of our partnership with Teresa, Scott and ‘Hawkeye,’” Grant Harris, vice president of Cook Children’s Health Foundation said. “Our Duckprints wall will be a constant reminder to our patients and their families that they are not alone in their fight against cancer.”

Gallery

Watch Video
Esme & dad, speaking at awards ceremony

Aflac Duckprints Awards

For three years, the Aflac Duck has traveled across the country visiting children’s cancer hospitals, honoring brave and courageous individuals who have made an impact in the fight against childhood cancer. Their contributions are acknowledged by their communities and Aflac's Duckprints Awards.

Watch Video